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Institute for Vaccine Safety

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

615 N. Wolfe Street

Room W5041

Baltimore, MD 21205

www.vaccinesafety.edu

 

 

Recommended Immunization Schedule
Ages 7-18 Years

UNITED STATES • 2012

 

Age
 Vaccine

7-10 years

11-12 years

13-18 years

Tetanus, Diphtheria,  Pertussis
Tdapa Tdap Tdap
Human Papillomavirus
  HPV (3 doses)b HPV Series
Meningococcal
MCV MCVc MCVc Booster at 16 yr
Influenza
Influenza (yearly)d
Pneumococcal
Pneumococcal Vaccinee
Hepatitis A
Hep A Seriesf
Hepatitis B
Hep B Series
Inactivated Poliovirus
IPV Series
Measles, Mumps,
Rubella
MMR Series
Varicella
Varicella Series

 

a. Tdap vaccine is combination vaccine that is recommended at age 11 or 12 to protect against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. If your child has not received any or all of the DTaP vaccine series, or if you don’t know if your child has received these shots, your child needs a single dose of Tdap when they are 7 -10 years old. Talk to your child’s health care provider to find out if they need additional catch-up vaccines.
b. All 11 or 12 year olds – both girls and boys – should receive 3 doses of HPV vaccine to protect against HPV-related disease. Either HPV vaccine (Cervarix® or Gardasil®) can be given to girls and young women; only one HPV vaccine (Gardasil®) can be given to boys and young men.
c. Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV) is recommended at age 11 or 12. A booster shot is recommended at age 16. Teens who received MCV for the first time at age 13 through 15 years will need a one-time booster dose between the ages of 16 and 18 years. If your teenager missed getting the vaccine altogether, ask their health care provider about getting it now, especially if your teenager is about to move into a college dorm or military barracks.
d. Everyone 6 months of age and older—including preteens and teens—should get a flu vaccine every year. Children under the age of 9 years may require more than one dose. Talk to your child’s health care provider to find out if they need more than one dose.
e. A single dose of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) is recommended for children who are 6 - 18 years old with certain medical conditions that place them at high risk. Talk to your healthcare provider about pneumococcal vaccine and what factors may place your child at high risk for pneumococcal disease.
f. Hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for older children with certain medical conditions that place them at high risk. HepA vaccine is licensed, safe, and effective for all children of all ages. Even if your child is not at high risk, you may decide you want your child protected against HepA. Talk to your healthcare provider about HepA vaccine and what factors may place your child at high risk for HepA.

This page was last updated on November 22, 2013